Courses

LAW 631D | 1 credits

Joseph Kalt & Stephen Cornell 

3 days in January 2021: course dates coming soon!


This course examines the development challenges faced by contemporary Native nations. Utilizing numerous case studies and extensive research on what is working and what is not working to promote the social, political, cultural and economic strengthening of American Indian nations, the course emphasizes themes applicable to community development and nation rebuilding worldwide. Historical and relevant federal Indian policy and case law are used as background material, but the course emphasizes the interdisciplinary nature of the “nation building revolution” underway in Indian Country. Additional emphasis is placed on how tribal initiatives can conflict with federal case law, state jurisdiction, and federal policies and politics. 

KEY QUESTIONS:
  • What is working, and what is not working, to promote the social, political, cultural and economic strengthening of Native nations and Indigenous governance?  
  • While the primary focus of the course is on the American Indian experience, what principles of nation building are applicable to Indigenous peoples worldwide? 
  • In what ways have American Indian policy and case law promoted and impeded tribal self-governance? 
  • What conflicts between federal, state, and local governments can arise from tribal assertions of self-governance? 

When

8 a.m. Jan. 16, 2020 to 12:20 p.m. Jan. 18, 2020

Event Contacts

Stephen Cornell

LAW525 | 1 credit

Miriam Jorgensen & Joan Timeche 

3 days in January 2021: course dates coming soon!


As Indigenous Peoples enter the 21st century, economic development stands out as a critical challenge for the maintenance of their communities, identities, and status as sovereigns. This course examines the Indigenous governance issues surrounding economic development as a tool for helping Indigenous Peoples achieve their nation-building and tribal self-governance goals on their own terms. The course will address a broad range of questions including:  

  • How can Indigenous entrepreneurship, public finance, and nation-owned enterprises facilitate nation building and help assert practical sovereignty? 
  • What impacts might tribal constitutional reform have upon development of an Indigenous nation’s legal infrastructure, education, social welfare, and cultural preservation? 
  • What procurement issues impact Indigenous nations’ securitization of resources? 

When

8 a.m. Jan. 20, 2020 to 12:20 p.m. Jan. 22, 2020

Event Contacts

LAW 631J | 1 credit

Stephen Cornell & Miriam Jorgensen

FALL COURSE SERIES: November 18-20, 2021. 1:30-5:50pm


Although the need for change is often great within Indigenous communities – particularly in places where Indigenous rights and Indigenous governance are not yet fully respected – it is not always clear how real change can come about. This course explores ways to assess and prioritize Indigenous community needs with respect to nation building and uses case studies to explore how tribal governments work within legal constraints to serve their communities and assert their rights. 

KEY QUESTIONS:

  • How might Indigenous nations assess and prioritize their community’s nation-building needs? 
  • How do tribes work within non-Indigenous legal constraints to serve their communities and assert their rights? 
  • How can Indigenous communities make “real change” happen? 

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When

1:30 p.m. Nov. 18, 2021 to 5:50 p.m. Nov. 20, 2021

Where

Online via Zoom

Event Contacts

Miriam Jorgensen

This course is foundational to Native nation building & recommended for ALL JIT participants

LAW 631D | 1 credit

Stephen Cornell, Joan Timeche, Miriam Jorgensen & Danielle Hiraldo

Course access begins December 20th, 2021 and ends January 11th, 2022.


PLEASE NOTE: This course is a NEW offering for JIT 2022! The course content is the same, but will be delivered via our NEW Rebuilding Native Nations Online Course, an autonomous course featuring instructional videos, tribal leader interviews, and learning activities. The JIT 2022 course features additional assignments and multiple live Q&A sessions with faculty between January 3rd- January 11th.

This course examines the development challenges faced by contemporary Native nations. Utilizing numerous case studies and extensive research on what is working and what is not working to promote the social, political, cultural and economic strengthening of American Indian nations, the course emphasizes themes applicable to community development and nation rebuilding worldwide. Historical and relevant federal Indian policy and case law are used as background material, but the course emphasizes the interdisciplinary nature of the “nation building revolution” underway in Indian Country. Additional emphasis is placed on how tribal initiatives can conflict with federal case law, state jurisdiction, and federal policies and politics. 

KEY QUESTIONS:
  • What is working, and what is not working, to promote the social, political, cultural and economic strengthening of Native nations and Indigenous governance?  
  • While the primary focus of the course is on the American Indian experience, what principles of nation building are applicable to Indigenous peoples worldwide? 
  • In what ways have American Indian policy and case law promoted and impeded tribal self-governance? 
  • What conflicts between federal, state, and local governments can arise from tribal assertions of self-governance? 

When

8 a.m. Dec. 20, 2021 to 5:50 p.m. Jan. 11, 2022

Where

Online via UArizona's D2L and Zoom

Event Contacts

Stephen Cornell

LAW 579A | 1 credit

Seánna Howard

January 9th-11th, 2022. 1:30pm-5:50pm


Indigenous peoples and tribal governments are increasingly turning to international law and the international human rights system as a means of protecting their lands and property. This course focuses on the critical role that international law—including international bodies such as the United Nations and the Organization of American States, etc.—play in protecting Indigenous peoples’ rights to property, self-determination, cultural integrity, life, etc. This course also examines how international law precedents can be used when arguing for Indigenous rights and tribal self-governance at the domestic level. 

KEY QUESTIONS:
  • How can the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples be used to advance Indigenous governance and rights at home? 
  • How can international law mechanisms be used to address Indigenous peoples’ desire to protect lands, property, and culture? 
  • How can the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights be utilized within contexts of disputes over lands and natural resources?

When

1:30 p.m. Jan. 9, 2022 to 5:50 p.m. Jan. 11, 2022

Event Contacts

LAW 631P | 1 credit

Desi Small-Rodriguez, PhD

January 3rd-5th, 2022. 1:30pm-5:50pm


The demand for Indigenous data is increasing in Indian Country as tribes engage in economic, social, and cultural development on a rapid scale. Additionally, tribes seek methods to protect their cultural and proprietary information. This course will examine the role of Indigenous data as an exercise of sovereignty in Indigenous governance and self-determination. It will dually explore data collected internally by tribes and Native communities, and information collected by external sources.

The course draws from best practices in Indian Country and across international Indigenous communities. With a focus on both scholarship and tangible data practice, students will receive hands-on training facilitating the pragmatic use of Indigenous data to build strong evidence bases for tribal governments, nations and communities.

At the completion of this course, students will be able to:
  • Understand what terms such as “Indigenous data sovereignty” and “data governance” mean, and recognize the implications of such terms—both for Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples, communities, nations, and institutions;
  • Describe how Indigenous data sovereignty and data governance link to nation rebuilding; and
  • Realize how data that Indigenous peoples and nations collect, analyze, and use may be different from mainstream data and the importance of leveraging existing data to support Indigenous aspirations for collective well-being.

When

1:30 p.m. Jan. 3, 2022 to 5:50 p.m. Jan. 5, 2022

Event Contacts

Desi Small-Rodriguez

LAW 631K | 1 credit

Miriam Jorgensen & Jonathan Taylor

January 6th-8th, 2022. 8am-12:20pm


Supported by three decades of research, Indigenous self-determination and tribal self-governance have proven to be the most effective policies when it comes to addressing economic disparities affecting Indigenous communities and empowering tribal governments to exercise real control over their cultures, lives, and societies.

KEY QUESTIONS:
  • What specific data support the core principles of Indigenous nation building (self-determination, effective and legitimate governing institutions, strategic orientation, and public-spirited leadership)?  
  • What is the basis of the argument that Indigenous self-determination and self-government are the most effective nation rebuilding policies?  
  • How can course participants contextualize the Indigenous research findings for their own communities?

When

8 a.m. Jan. 6, 2022 to 12:20 p.m. Jan. 8, 2022

Event Contacts

Miriam Jorgensen

LAW 631L | 1 credit

Miriam Jorgensen & Alison Vivian

2023 Dates TBD


This course considers the question, “What is a constitution?” and explores different types of Indigenous nation constitutions, important concepts for constitutions to address, and the process for developing one appropriate for each community. 

KEY QUESTIONS:
  • How do constitutions facilitate tribal self-governance? 
  • How can constitutions help shape development of capable governing institutions? 
  • What should Indigenous nations bear in mind when considering tribal constitution reform ? 
  • What are constitutions, and what is their role in the lives of Native nations, and the history of Indigenous constitutional governance?

When

All Day Jan. 1, 2023

Event Contacts

Miriam Jorgensen

LAW 631M | 1 credit

May qualify for up to 12 hours of CLE credit for State Bar of Arizona members*

Robert A. Williams, Jr.

January 9th-11th, 2022. 8am-12:20pm


The course will investigate the role that law plays in the lives of Indigenous peoples and in their on-going efforts to secure their rights of equality, tribal self-governance, and self-determination. The course draws from comparative sources with a focus on how law can be used pragmatically by Indigenous leaders, communities, their partners and advocates to effect meaningful change.

KEY QUESTIONS:
  • How does law function to perpetuate a history of assimilation and racism within governmental institutions around the world? 
  • How can Indigenous peoples use law to secure rights and exercise tribal self-governance? 
  • What role can legal institutions play in the processes of Indigenous nation building?

*Registration in this course may qualify for up to 12 hours of CLE credit for State Bar of Arizona members, including 0 hour(s) of professional responsibility. The State Bar of Arizona does not approve or accredit CLE activities for the Mandatory Continuing Legal Education requirement. Contact the State Bar of Arizona for more details. For details on CLE eligibility outside of Arizona, please contact your State Bar Association.

When

8 a.m. Jan. 9, 2022 to 12:20 p.m. Jan. 11, 2022

Event Contacts

Robert Williams Jr.

Law 656B | 1 credit

Stephen Cornell, PhD & Daryle Rigney

January 9th-11th, 2022. 1:30-5:50pm


Across the globe, Indigenous peoples are engaged in the work of Indigenous governance regardless of whether they use that term or not. This course will examine different systems of Indigenous governance with an emphasis on Indigenous peoples living in Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and the United States. 

While these four countries share certain features, like English legal and political heritages, they also differ in important ways. Those differences have affected the patterns, and outcomes of Indigenous self-determination and self-government efforts. Three questions form the subject matter of this course:

  • What are the commonalities/differences among these four countries and their impacts on Indigenous assertions of self-governing power? 
  • How and why do the patterns of Indigenous self-government vary across these four countries? 
  • What, if anything, might Indigenous peoples learn from each other across these countries as they assert and implement rights of self-government?

When

1:30 p.m. Jan. 9, 2022 to 5:50 p.m. Jan. 11, 2022

Event Contacts

Stephen Cornell
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